SCHOOL ZONE-Flash Cards
These are a great way to help your child learn while making it fun! These cards feature colorful illustrations, letters and picture words
Alphabet can teach your child letters and beginning sounds while the parent card suggests activities that will help your child develop important skills and enjoy learning
This package contains one box of fifty-six 5-1/4×3-1/4 inch flashcards (one parent card, three index cards, twenty-six uppercase cards and twenty-six lowercase cards
Available in a variety of age groups and subjects (each sold separately)

Find our complete line of educational resources at Amazon.com/SchoolZonePublishing.

CARD FEATURES

  • 56 cards: 55 sight words, 1 parent
  • For ages 5 and up
  • Large 3.0″ x 5.575″ glossy cardstock
  • 110 high-frequency words important for early reading mastery
  • Big, easy-to-read words and colorful illustrations
  • Beginning readers practice recognizing and pronouncing common words
  • Rounded corners make sorting and handling easier

 

EXCELLENT – See it, say it, learn it! Help your child take the first steps toward reading with these Sight Words Flash Cards. These two-sided cards are fun and easy to use with basic words frequently used in beginning reader books. This is a set of flash cards for kids are sure to enjoy with their colorful illustrations! The Parent Card includes additional activities and games to supplement the 110 basic sight words in the deck. Flip the flashcards open for fun learning that’s perfect for home or school! This flash card set is intended for children Ages 5 and up; kindergarten to 1st grade.

FLASH CARDS FOR KIDS – Kids and parents who use our flashcards for practice testing are using one of the most effective learning techniques available. A hundred years of research shows practice testing is highly likely to boost retention. Learning skills through gameplay is an excellent strategy for many reasons. Kids learning card games are fun and motivating, and games also tend to help children deepen their understanding and reasoning. Because games feel more like play than work, they can encourage kids to explore and experiment with concepts more freely.